Uncontested Divorce

 

di·vorce forms
pronunciation:
/do it yourself/
noun
1. forms you use to file for a divorce.
Where do you get divorce forms?
Many state courts provide divorce forms for free on their websites or at the courthouse! Often, the forms you buy from third parties are the exact same forms or similar to those that are provided for free!

 

When should I use divorce forms?

If you have a lawyer, you should always consult him or her for legal advice. Often, people who have an uncontested divorce use divorce forms to file for a divorce. Many document preparation services are simply filling the forms out for you. In fact, only attorneys can give you legal advice about your divorce. If you have a contested divorce, you may want to seek legal advice from a lawyer.

find divorce forms online

Click any of the links to learn more! We will be updating this page in the future. Stay tuned!

Colorado Divorce Forms

Click here to go to the State Courts Form site


See also:

Colorado Separation

Colorado Divorce Forms (with Children)

Learn more about divorce law:

What is a divorce?

What is an uncontested divorce?

What is a contested divorce?

What is an annulment?

What are the reasons you can get divorced?

 

di·vorce forms
pronunciation:
/do it yourself/
noun
1. forms you use to file for a divorce.
Where do you get divorce forms?
Many state courts provide divorce forms for free on their websites or at the courthouse! Often, the forms you buy from third parties are the exact same forms or similar to those that are provided for free!

 

When should I use divorce forms?

If you have a lawyer, you should always consult him or her for legal advice. Often, people who have an uncontested divorce use divorce forms to file for a divorce. Many document preparation services are simply filling the forms out for you. In fact, only attorneys can give you legal advice about your divorce. If you have a contested divorce, you may want to seek legal advice from a lawyer.

find divorce forms online

Click any of the links to learn more! We will be updating this page in the future. Stay tuned!

Connecticut Divorce Forms

Click here to go to the State Courts Form sites

Filing for a Divorce with Children in Connecticut

Filing for Divorce without Children in Connecticut


See also:

Connecticut Courts Page with related Links

Learn more about divorce law:

What is a divorce?

What is an uncontested divorce?

What is a contested divorce?

What is an annulment?

What are the reasons you can get divorced?

 

di·vorce forms
pronunciation:
/do it yourself/
noun
1. forms you use to file for a divorce.
Where do you get divorce forms?
Many state courts provide divorce forms for free on their websites or at the courthouse! Often, the forms you buy from third parties are the exact same forms or similar to those that are provided for free!

 

When should I use divorce forms?

If you have a lawyer, you should always consult him or her for legal advice. Often, people who have an uncontested divorce use divorce forms to file for a divorce. Many document preparation services are simply filling the forms out for you. In fact, only attorneys can give you legal advice about your divorce. If you have a contested divorce, you may want to seek legal advice from a lawyer.  People seeking to represent themselves in Divorce Court may find these forms helpful.

find divorce forms online

Click any of the links to learn more! We will be updating this page in the future. Stay tuned!

STATE DIVORCE LAWS

These are links to each of our pages which contain States Divorce Forms which are free:

    1. Alabama Divorce Forms
    2. Alaska Divorce Forms
    3. Arizona Divorce Forms
    4. Arkansas Divorce Forms
    5. California Divorce Forms
    6. Colorado Divorce Forms
    7. ConnecticutDivorce Forms
    8. Delaware Divorce Forms
    9. Florida Divorce Forms
    10. Georgia Divorce Forms
    11. Hawaii Divorce Forms
    12. Idaho Divorce Forms
    13. Illinois Divorce Forms
    14. Indiana Divorce Forms
    15. Iowa Divorce Forms
    16. Kansas Divorce Forms
    17. Kentucky Divorce Forms
    18. Louisiana Divorce Forms
    19. Maine Divorce Forms
    20. Maryland Divorce Forms
    21. Massachusetts Divorce Forms
    22. Michigan Divorce Forms
    23. Minnesota Divorce Forms
    24. Mississippi Divorce Forms
    25. Missouri Divorce Forms
    26. Montana Divorce Forms
    27. Nebraska Divorce Forms
    28. Nevada Divorce Forms
    29. New Hampshire Divorce Forms
    30. New Jersey Divorce Forms
    31. New Mexico Divorce Forms
    32. New York Divorce Forms

 

    1. North Carolina Divorce Forms
    2. North Dakota Divorce Forms
    3. Ohio Divorce Forms
    4. Oklahoma Divorce Laws
    5. Oregon Divorce Forms
    6. Pennsylvania Divorce Forms
    7. Rhode Island Divorce Forms
    8. South Carolina Divorce Forms
    9. South Dakota Divorce Forms
    10. Tennessee Divorce Forms
    11. Texas Divorce Forms

 

  1. Utah Divorce Forms
  2. Vermont Divorce Forms
  3. Virginia Divorce Forms
  4. Washington Divorce Forms
  5. West Virginia Divorce Forms
  6. Wisconsin Divorce Forms
  7. Wyoming Divorce Forms
  8. District of Columbia Divorce Forms
  9. Puerto Rico Divorce Forms

 

 

an·nul·ment
pronunciation:
/it never happened/
noun
1.  the act of annulling.
2. the formal invalidation of a marriage. Ruling declaring a marriage & void.
it never happened? Kinda.
1. it is like it gets erased. seriously. At least, the sacrament of marriage does.

 

What is an annulment?

An annulment is a ruling that a marriage did not occur.  If a marriage is annulled, it is as if it never even happened! It is deemed null from the beginning. Annulments are often obtained from a religious entity, such as the Catholic Church.

what are the grounds for annulment?

  • Prior undisclosed marriage.
  • Spouse living at the time of the marriage. (also known as Bigamy)
  • A party to the marriage was underage at the time of marriage and did not have parental consent.
  • A party to the marriage was under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • The marriage was obtained by means of fraud.
  • The marriage was obtained based upon the placement of one party under duress.
  • A spouse is incurably unable to have sexual intercourse.
  • One party’s mental capacity rendered him or her unable to understand the nature, effect or consequences of the marriage.

This list is not fully exhaustive.  Often, the grounds for an annulment are set forth in the law and statutes of a particular state, country, jurisdiction or religion. Click here to learn about Annulment in New York.

annulment news:

Pope Frances has radically revised the process by which Catholics can get their marriages annulled! Annulments for Catholics will now be cheaper, quicker, and easier to obtain!

Click here for more on this story from CNN! 

Click here for the text of the Pope’s motu proprio issuances on annulment

Click here for annulment statistics and annulment ratios

Click here for 9 things to know about the reformed Annulment Process


religious annulment

Rules & Cannons governing annulment in the Catholic Church:

Code of Cannon Law from the Vatican

western catholic church

Code of Cannons of Oriental Churches

eastern catholic churches

The difference between annulment and divorce is simple. In a divorce, the marriage ends. In an annulment, the marriage is voided and ceases to exist!

Many States don’t provide Do It Yourself annulment Forms.  You should consult a divorce lawyer if you are interested in getting an annulment.


Sample State annulment Laws:

Annulment in Texas

Each year, approximately 27,000 Catholics get an annulment in the United States

Source: 2012 Figures from the Center for Applied Research at Georgetown University

How long does an annulment take?

Pope Francis has put into place measures aimed towards making the process of getting an annulment take less than 45 days! It can take 12 to 18 months to get an annulment.

Click here for more on this story from CNN! 

Click here for the text of the Pope’s motu proprio issuances on annulment

Click here for information on the annulment process from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

How much does an annulment cost?

An annulment can cost between $200 and $1000 plus legal and other fees.

Click here for information on the annulment process from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

State annulment resources:

How to get an annulment in California

How to get an annulment in Massachusetts 

How to get an annulment in New York

How to get an annulment in Texas – from TexasLawHelp.org

 

Divorce Laws by State

The following is a list of State Divorce Laws that can be found online. The links point to the actual statutes that govern divorce in each State. Divorce laws can be very complicated. It is recommended that you consult with your personal attorney for advice regarding your individual situation & circumstances. No representations are being made regarding the accuracy of these links. They are maintained by third parties and provided as a courtesy.


These are direct links to websites which contain state laws relating to divorce:

    1. Alabama Divorce Laws
    2. Alaska Divorce Laws
    3. Arizona Divorce Laws
    4. Arkansas Divorce Laws
    5. California Divorce Laws
    6. Colorado Divorce Laws
    7. Connecticut Divorce Laws
    8. Delaware Divorce Laws
    9. Florida Divorce Laws
    10. Georgia Divorce Laws
    11. Hawaii Divorce Laws
    12. Idaho Divorce Laws
    13. Illinois Divorce Laws
    14. Indiana Divorce Laws
    15. Iowa Divorce Laws
    16. Kansas Divorce Laws
    17. Kentucky Divorce Laws
    18. Louisiana Divorce Laws
    19. Maine Divorce Laws
    20. Maryland Divorce Laws – See also Maryland Military Divorce 
    21. Massachusetts Divorce Laws
    22. Michigan Divorce Laws
    23. Minnesota Divorce Laws
    24. Mississippi Divorce Laws
    25. Missouri Divorce Laws
    26. Montana Divorce Laws
    27. Nebraska Divorce Laws
    28. Nevada Divorce Laws
    29. New Hampshire Divorce Laws
    30. New Jersey Divorce Laws
    31. New Mexico Divorce Laws
    32. New York Divorce Laws

    1. North Carolina Divorce Laws
    2. North Dakota Divorce Laws
    3. Ohio Divorce Laws
    4. Oklahoma Divorce Laws
    5. Oregon Divorce Laws
    6. Pennsylvania Divorce Laws
    7. Rhode Island Divorce Laws
    8. South Carolina Divorce Laws
    9. South Dakota Divorce Laws
    10. Tennessee Divorce Laws
    11. Texas Divorce Laws

  1. Utah Divorce Laws
  2. Vermont Divorce Laws
  3. Virginia Divorce Laws
  4. Washington Divorce Laws
  5. West Virginia Divorce Laws
  6. Wisconsin Divorce Laws
  7. Wyoming Divorce Laws
  8. District of Columbia Divorce Laws – DC Military Divorce Law
  9. Puerto Rico Divorce Laws

 

Source: Cornell University School of Law, Legal Information Institute

What is the Divorce Process?

.

The divorce process varies based upon the State in which the divorce is taking place.  However there are some occurrences common to most divorces:

.

1. Decide whether to hire a divorce lawyer.

2. Compile financial documents/records & start making lists of assets.

3. Choose the Jurisdiction that will allow you to get a divorce. Draft & file the Initial Documents.

4. Serve your spouse with Divorce Papers.

5. Speak with your Spouse (in or out of Court) to determine whether you have a contested divorce or uncontested divorce.

6. Engage in discovery (Court process through which evidence is exchanged during a divorce).

7. Identify what items are marital property and separate property.

8. Either agree to how marital property is split or go to trial in Court to split the assets and liabilities of the marriage.

9. If there are children, decide what the custody arrangement will be (or go to trial). If there is joint custody, one parent is often the custodial parent.

10. If there are children, decide how much child support will be paid (or have a hearing at Court to determine child support). Child support is usually paid to the spouse that makes less money, where applicable, even when the parties have identical visitation time.

11. Draft a stipulation of Settlement regarding all outstanding issues and submit it to the court.

12. Make sure that your medical insurance is not affected by divorce and if so, plan to file for COBRA.

13. Wait. It often takes quite a while from the time the divorce papers are filed until a court issues a Judgment of Divorce.

14. Obtain Judgment of Divorce. Serve it on your former spouse.

15. Start your new life.

See also:

How long does divorce take 

 

marital
property
pronounciation:
stuff acquired during the marriage/
noun
1.Property considered by the courts to belong only to the marriage. It is available for distribution between the parties during a divorce (known as equitable distribution). Marital Property is usually acquired during the marriage by one or both spouses.

 



Marital Property is property that belongs to one spouse or the other but was acquired during the marriage. In most States, property obtained during the marriage is considered marital property and has to be split during a divorce. Any property, regardless of which spouse is named as owner, that the husband or wife obtained from the date of marriage to the beginning of the divorce action is usually marital property.  A house, car, IRA, bank account(s), pension, annuity, business and advanced degree (in some States) are all examples of marital property. However, an inheritance, a gift from someone other than a spouse, or compensation for personal injuries, may be deemed separate property. Often  marital property is stuff that a party got during the marriage, or that is marital property because of a prenuptial agreement between the parties which lists that particular property as marital property.



Even if property was agreed by the parties to be the separate property of a particular party, or is separate property because of a rule of law, in some States, if such property was commingled into the marriage, it can be considered converted to marital property. This often happens when a other spouse engages in acts that creates appreciation in the separate property. This can take place for instance when one spouse owns a house and the other spouse spends time working on the house to repair it and those acts create an increase in the value of the house. At the very least, the non-owner spouse can argue that the appreciation in value has become part of the marital property and should be divided in a divorce.

marital property is usually divided in divorce proceedings

Check out:

Getting Married? Got Assets? Read This First

Texas Community Property Law

 

separate
property
pronounciation:
stuff belongs to a particular party/
noun
1.Property considered by the courts to belong only to one spouse or the other. It is not available for distribution between the parties during a divorce (known as equitable distribution).

 

Separate Property is property that belongs to one spouse. This type of property is not considered marital property and does not have to be split during a divorce. Often separate property is stuff that a party had before the marriage, that one inherited, or that is separate property because of a prenuptial agreement between the parties which lists that particular property as separate property.

 

Even if property was agreed by the parties to be the separate property of a particular party, or is separate property because of a rule of law, in some States, if such property was commingled into the marriage, it can be considered converted to marital property. This often happens when a other spouse engages in acts that creates appreciation in the separate property. This can take place for instance when one spouse owns a house and the other spouse spends time working on the house to repair it and those acts create an increase in the value of the house. At the very least, the non-owner spouse can argue that the appreciation in value has become part of the marital property and should be divided in a divorce.

separate property is not usually divided in divorce proceedings

 


 

grounds
for divorce
pronounciation:
why?/
noun
1. the reason for the legal dissolution of a marriage by a court or other competent body.
verb
1. reason to legally dissolve one’s marriage with (someone).

 

In order to get a divorce, you must have a reason to divorce!

what are the grounds for divorce?

The grounds for divorce vary from state to state! Here are some common ones:

  • Irretrievable Breakdown: The relationship of a husband and wife has broken down irretrievably. Many jurisdictions require there to be some time before you can file. In New York State, to file under this ground, the relationship has to have been broken down irretrievably for at least six months. This is sometimes referred to as NO FAULT DIVORCE.
  • Cruel and inhuman treatment: Your spouse has been cruel and inhuman in his or her treatment of you. You can not use this ground if it was you who was cruel and inhuman. Many jurisdictions want the acts alleged to be pretty recent and in most cases, in the last couple of years.
  • Abandonment: When your spouse leaves you or abandons you. Many jurisdictions require a minimum amount of time for abandonment. In New York, it has to be at least a year. If you were the one who left, you can not use this ground.  
  • Separation Agreement: This ground confuses many people. It is to some extent like an uncontested divorce. You and your spouse enter into an agreement to separate. The agreement states what you are going to do, who gets what, and how things will go. In many jurisdictions, you must file that agreement with the Court. Then, after being separated and living apart for a certain period of time which varies based upon the State you are getting divorced in, you can apply to the Court for a divorce.
  • Adultery: If your spouse cheats on you, this may be a ground for divorce. If you cheat on your spouse, you can not use your cheating to substantiate this ground. If you sleep with your spouse after the adultery has been discovered, you may not be able to use this ground and many courts will say you have reaffirmed the marriage. You also can not wait years after the discovery of the cheating acts to file.  Adultery must also be proven. You have to get a witness to prove the adultery took place. It is a very difficult ground to prove. This is often why people hire private investigators to follow their spouses around. Televisions shows based upon the premise that people need proof of adultery have been widely popular around the globe. If someone didn’t see the feat, for purposes of divorce, your spouse didn’t cheat.
  • Imprisonment: If your husband or wife is imprisoned for a certain amount of time during the marriage, this may be a ground for divorce. In New York, your spouse must be imprisoned for three or more years. Many jurisdictions want the imprisonment to be pretty recent rather than waiting to file. In New York for instance, if it has been more than five years since your spouse was released from prison, you may not be able to use this ground.
  • No Fault: In many jurisdictions, there is a ground that allows parties to get divorced without having to place fault on a particular party.  This is usually called a No Fault Ground. Often No Fault grounds center around the breakdown of the marriage and require a certain amount of time to have elapsed, but do not center on the fault of any particular party. Such no fault grounds are important as they help lower barriers to getting a divorce. In many States, it has been very difficult historically to obtain a divorce. No Fault grounds help to provide the remedy of divorce to people who might have otherwise had problems proving the things that would allow for divorce, such as adultery.

If one person does not want to get a divorce, that person is contesting the grounds for divorce and the divorce is a contested divorce!

Alienation of affection is a cause of action against a third party brought by a spouse who has been deserted. The crux of an alienation of affection suit is that the third party is responsible for the failure of the marriage. This cause of action has been abolished in many jurisdictions. North Carolina is a jurisdiction where these suits are still used.

 

Suggested topics:

 

un·con·test·ed
di·vorce
pronounciation:
no outstanding issues/
noun
1. a divorce in which both parties agree on the grounds for divorce and there are no disagreements as to any issues, including finances, assets, child custody & child support.
verb
1. legally dissolve one’s marriage with (someone) without issue or by default.

 

A divorce is only uncontested if there are no outstanding issues.  None.

In order to be an uncontested divorce the parties must agree about:

  • Grounds: The parties must agree on the reason for the divorce (irretrievable breakdown, abandonment, etc).
  • Property: The parties must agree on how marital property (including bank accounts, real estate & businesses) will be split. The must be in agreement as to how retirement assets and other such property should be dealt with.
  • Maintenance/Alimony: The parties must agree whether there will be maintenance or alimony and if so, the amounts and length of time such is to be paid.
  • Child Support: If there are children, the amount to be paid in child support must not in dispute.
  • Child Custody: There should be an agreement as to whether there is joint custody and/or a certain party is the custodial parent.  A visitation and parenting plan should be created and agreed upon.

If the parties disagree about anything, then they have a contested divorce

Click about to learn more about contested divorces.

 judgment of divorce =

agreement/judgment as to grounds + agreement/judgment as to assets + agreement/judgment as to all other issues including child support & child custody

uncontested divorces are much cheaper than contested divorces!

uncontested divorces are much quicker than contested divorces!